vincent dixie

House Dems make change in No. 2 leadership position

House Democrats have voted to replace Rep. Vincent Dixie as caucus chair after an election cycle in which the minority’s numbers shrank. The caucus instead elected Rep. John Ray Clemmons for the No. 2 leadership post. Both are Nashville Democrats.

House Democrats lost one Memphis seat to redistricting and other when longtime Rep. John Mark Windle of Livingston decided to run for re-election as an independent. He lost to Republican Ed Butler.

Democrat Ronnie Glynn earlier this month narrowly held on to a Clarksville seat vacated by Jason Hodges and a Caleb Hemmer won an open race for a newly drawn district in southern Davidson County.

Here’s the release from House Democrats:

NASHVILLE — The Tennessee House Democratic Caucus today elected its leadership positions for the upcoming 113th General Assembly of the Tennessee House of Representatives.  Rep. Karen Camper of Memphis remains House Minority Leader and Rep. John Ray Clemmons is the newly-elected Caucus Chair.  Rep. Clemmons said that he’s “honored by the trust shown in him by the Caucus membership” and said he’s “ready to get to work on the challenges that lie ahead.”   Other positions elected today were as follows:

— Assistant Minority Leader: Rep. Harold Love of Nashville

— House Floor Leader: Rep. Bill Beck of Nashville

— Minority Whip: Rep. Jason Powell of Nashville

— Caucus Vice-Chair: Rep. Bob Freeman of Nashville

— Caucus Treasurer: Rep. Gloria Johnson of Knoxville

— Caucus Secretary: Rep. Ronnie Glynn of Clarksville

— Leader Pro Tempore: Rep. Larry Miller of Memphis

In addition to the above, Rep. Dwayne Thompson of Memphis and Rep. Johnny Shaw of Bolivar were elected to fill the 2 House Democratic positions on the Joint Fiscal Review Committee. 

Dems call for transparency, community input for redistricting process

Sen. Jeff Yarbro (D-Nashville) attends a floor session to adjust the course of the legislative session in response to the coronavirus pandemic on March 16, 2020. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

With raw census data scheduled to be released on Thursday, Tennessee Democrats are calling for transparency in the once-per-decade redistricting process.

Here’s the full release:

NASHVILLE — Tennessee communities should have a voice in mapping the state’s political future for the next decade, lawmakers said Tuesday in a letter to legislative leaders, and citizens should not have to wait until 2022 to see new proposed district lines.

The process of drawing new electoral boundaries for the U.S. House of Representatives and state legislative districts only happens once every 10 years after the U.S. Census releases local data.

While many states have laws that require political boundaries to be drawn with community input, Tennessee’s process is controlled entirely by the majority party in the legislature.

In a letter dated Aug. 10, Democratic leaders in the Tennessee General Assembly urged the Republican speakers of both chambers to commit to an open and transparent process that provides citizens with opportunities to offer feedback on proposed maps.

“Perhaps more than any other single decision, the drawing of district boundaries will shape the policies adopted by the state over the next decade,” the lawmakers wrote. “We believe Tennesseans understand their communities and deserve a voice in how their communities will be represented.”

The letter was signed by ​​Democratic leaders Sen. Jeff Yarbro (D-Nashville) and Rep. Karen Camper (D-Memphis) as well as both caucus chairs, Sen. Raumesh Akbari (D-Memphis) and Rep. Vincent Dixie (D-Nashville).

In the letter, lawmakers called on the speakers to follow three community-driven principles for drawing Tennessee’s new legislative districts:

1. Maintain an open and transparent process. “Citizens deserve a districting process they can understand and trust, as well as information about how they will be able to engage with key decisionmakers. In many states, this process includes a special committee that travels the state hosting public meetings, as well as a website that provides the public with the same updated information available to the legislative decisionmakers.”

2. Offer public and community engagement opportunities. “Citizens deserve opportunities, prior to our regular legislative session, to engage on this issue. We would request that a series of public hearings be held across the state, and that these hearings also be broadcast online, and that the General Assembly employ digital tools to permit the public to offer input and even submit district map proposals.”

3. Seek public input on the first drafts of maps this fall. “Throughout the nation, it’s become common for citizens and communities to review proposed maps well in advance of final adoption. We would propose making first drafts available to the public this fall in an easily usable format, with updates released prior to any formal consideration. Community leaders and members of the public need time to review maps, offer input, and even suggest or request changes prior to any community districting legislation being voted upon.”

“The community districting process should be among the most public endeavors that our state government undertakes. The General Assembly has access to the technology to make this process transparent and even interactive,” the Democratic leaders wrote. “Far from slowing down the legislative work of drawing new district lines, we believe such efforts would not only build trust but also lead to a stronger final product.”

On Aug. 12, the ​​Census Bureau<https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2021/news-conference-2020-census-redistricting-data.html> will publish the first local level results from the 2020 Census, including data on race, ethnicity and the voting-age population.

Changes in population and demographics that have taken place over a decade will be used to draw new federal and state district maps — roughly equal in population.

Earlier this year, the nonpartisan group Think Tennessee<https://www.thinktennessee.org/research/elections-civic-life/> wrote about the benefits of a more public and transparent community districting process.

“Opening a window into Tennessee’s redistricting process to allow citizens to meaningfully participate would enhance their trust in the system,” Think wrote. “In a state that consistently ranks near the bottom of the country on voter registration and turnout, redistricting is a key opportunity to deepen civic engagement.”

Think also says Tennesseans historically have had fewer opportunities for public participation, and less access to draft district maps, than people in most other states.

“While most states proactively seek public input in the redistricting process, Tennesseans’ opportunities for engagement previously have been limited to submitting draft maps and sharing their opinions with their legislators,” the nonprofit wrote.

Dixie elected chair of House Democratic Caucus

Vincent Dixie.

State Rep. Vincent Dixie has been elected chair of the House Democratic Caucus. He succeeds Rep. Mike Stewart, who decided against running for another term as the chamber’s No. 2 Democrat.

Rep. Karen Camper of Memphis was unopposed in her bid for another term as House Minority Leader.

Dixie defeated Rep. Bo Mitchell in the final round of caucus voting. Rep. John Ray Clemmons was eliminated in the first round. All three candidates (plus Stewart) represent Nashville districts. Vote totals were not announced.

Dixie was elected to his second term in the House last month.

State Rep. Vincent Dixie sued by former campaign worker

A former campaign worker for state Rep. Vincent Dixie (D-Nashville) is suing the freshman lawmaker for unpaid wages.

The Tennessean’s Natalie Allison reports that Tamika White, the former field worker, alleges she was evicted from her home last month “in large part due to (Dixie’s) nonpayment” of $4,750 in ages.

Dixie said he had spoken with White a few months ago about paying the remaining balance of her wages over the next three months because he had to replenish his campaign funds and couldn’t raise money during the session.

“We don’t have any written contract,” Dixie said. “I can’t find it.”

“I don’t mind paying what I owe,” said Dixie, who has so far only paid White $1,750. “But I’m not going to pay some amount that (his attorney) has made up and thrown out there and thinks it’s going to stick.”

Dixie had $1,890 in his campaign account as of his most recent filing.