public corruption

Casada seeks up to 6-month delay for public corruption trial

Rep. Glen Casada (R-Franklin) appears before the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance on March 3, 2022. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Former state House Speaker Glen Casada (R-Franklin) is seeking a postponement of up to six months for his federal trial on public corruption charges. Proceedings had originally be scheduled to get underway.

According to his waiver of his right to a speedy trial, Casada wants the trial moved up to 180 days. If the postponement were anchored to his original Oct. 25 date, the trial would be rescheduled for no later than April 23 next year.

Casada’s attorneys write in the motion Friday that the delay is not opposed by federal prosecutors. The document makes no mention of codefendant Cade Cothren.

Here’s is the filing:

The defendant Glen Casada, through counsel, requests that this Court continue the trial of this matter, presently set for October 25, 2022, and all pretrial filing deadlines. In support, the defendant would show as follows:

1. On August 22, 2022, the Grand Jury for the Middle District of Tennessee returned the above referenced Indictment. (Dkt. 3).

2. The following day, Mr. Casada appeared with counsel and entered a Not Guilty plea. (Dkt. 10).

3. By Order entered August 24, 2022, this Honorable Court scheduled the trial of this matter to begin on October 25, 2022. (Dkt. 17).

4. After the parties agreement to the Government’s proposed protective order (see Dkt. 20), the Government produced pretrial disclosures to the defense on September 7, 2022. These materials included documents consisting of thousands of pages, multiple recordings, and contents of various devices seized and searched by law enforcement. Specifically, the production includes 805 files and 151 folders totaling 296 GB. The government’s cover letter accompanying the above referenced information also indicates that additional tranches of evidence will be produced in a later production.

5. Mr. Casada intends to vigorously defend against the allegations in the indictment. In order to effectively do so, both he and his counsel require sufficient time to evaluate and analyze all of the Government’s disclosures (both already made and to be made in the future), conduct his own investigation into the Government’s disclosures, and conduct his own independent investigation.

6. In light of the above, Mr. Casada submits that it is in the interest of justice to continue the trial of this matter so that he can adequately prepare. This request is grounded in Mr. Casada’s constitutional rights to due process, a fair trial, and effective assistance of counsel.

7. A speedy trial waiver is attached to this Motion.

8. Undersigned counsel has consulted with the U.S. Attorney’s Office regarding the requested relief. The Government does not oppose the Motion.

Casada indictment drops on 3rd anniversary of successor Sexton’s election as House speaker

Rep. Cameron Sexton presides over his first session as House speaker on Aug. 23, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Three years to the day that Rep. Cameron Sexton took over as speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives, federal prosecutors indicted his predecessor, Glen Casada, on bribery and kickback charges.

Here’s what Sexton had to say about Tuesday’s charges against Casada and his onetime chief of staff, Cade Cothren:

In Tennessee, we will not tolerate public corruption, defrauding our state, or bribery at any level. I commend the Federal Bureau of Investigation for its hard work, diligence, and dedication that resulted in this morning’s arrests.

As I have previously stated on several occasions, shortly after becoming speaker in 2019, I began assisting the federal authorities during and throughout their investigation — including leading up to today’s indictments, and I will continue to do so if a trial is needed.

Together, our legislative body has stood strong over the past two years to take significant actions during this investigation by passing laws to strengthen campaign finance regulations and new ethics laws for elected officials and staff.

Today is a good day for Tennesseans because we did not turn a blind eye on these criminal activities.

And here is House Democratic leader Karen Camper’s reaction:

When something like this happens, it reflects poorly on the entire Legislature. We are elected to serve the public and when that trust is broken, it’s very disheartening and erodes the confidence that our constituents have in government. This does however, highlight how badly campaign finance reform continues to be needed and that bi-partisan legislation already passed needs to go much farther.

This from House Republican leader William Lamberth and House Republican Caucus Chair Jeremy Faison:

The illegal behavior outlined in today’s indictments is extremely serious, and disappointing to our entire caucus. We appreciate Speaker Sexton’s leadership on this situation, as well as the efforts of our House leadership team in bringing these crimes to light. We also stand with federal law enforcement and are grateful for their efforts to hold those responsible for these crimes accountable. Now, we can all move forward and continue focusing on meeting the needs of citizens across Tennessee.

And here is Gov. Bill Lee’s spokeswoman Casey Sellers:

We trust the legal process and continue to hold Tennessee’s public servants to high standards of accountability. The Governor commends Speaker Sexton for running the House with integrity and setting the expectation that elected leaders must serve Tennesseans in good faith.