Buttigeig endorses Bradshaw, Harris

Pete Buttigeig (Photo credit: Win the Era)

Former presidential hopeful Pete Buttigeig is endorsing Tennessee Democratic candidates Marquita Bradshaw for U.S. Senate and Torrey Harris for state House.

Bradshaw was the surprise winner of the Democratic nomination in August over Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee favorite James Mackler, who ended up finishing third.

According to a Buttigeig statement posted by his Win the Era organization:

Marquita Bradshaw has spent her career advocating for her community and connecting with people around shared policy outcomes. These efforts are now the cornerstone of her groundbreaking, inspiring campaign. She knows first hand that policy should reflect the lived experiences of the people they are designed to help. She will bring this same perspective to the halls of the Senate and I’m excited to support Marquita in her historic run to represent the hard-working people of Tennessee.

Harris won the House District 90 nomination in Memphis after the state Democratic Party booted longtime state Rep. John DeBerry from its primary ballot due to his propensity of voting with Republicans on issues ranging from abortion to school vouchers.

Here’s what Buttigeig had to say about him:

Through Torrey Harris’ tireless work as a community advocate, he has modeled a willingness to listen, empower, and serve. That is exactly the type of leadership this moment demands and I’m proud to support his campaign.

Meanwhile, DeBerry was endorsed by the Americans for Prosperity and Republican U.S. Senate Bill Hagerty got the nod from the National Federation of Independent Business.

According to NFIB National Political Director Sharon Sussin:

Bill Hagerty has a true understanding of the challenges our members are facing. We have no doubt that he will be an excellent champion for them in the Senate, and we are pleased to endorse him”

18 Responses to Buttigeig endorses Bradshaw, Harris

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    LeeAnn C. says:

    Must be a really slow news day. Yawn.

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    Beatrice Shaw says:

    Tennessee is getting famous!! Real life celebrities on a national level ae stepping up to retake control. This is the type of efforts it will take to end corruption, expand Medicaid and pay teachers properly–among other things.

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      Stuart I. Anderson says:

      “Still Crazy, After All These Years.”

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        Cannoneer2 says:

        I’d rather have top paid teachers than a top paid Attorney General or Secretary of State. Let’s make our teachers the #1 most highly paid in the nation, joining Herb and Tre in their respective fields.

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          Stuart I. Anderson says:

          Yes I bet you would!!! You liberals are as adept at taking care of your base as are the Republicans in taking care of the boys in the Chamber of Commerce. Those of us interested in getting bang-for-the-buck, however, know the melancholy fact that there is little relationship between throwing money at government schools and student achievement or the school districts in New York City, D. C., and Newark would be among the top school districts in the nation. We’re simply too smart to fall for simplistic liberal solutions here in Tennessee thankfully.

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            Cannoneer2 says:

            I think that you are the only person who has ever called me a liberal, online or anywhere else! If that is a liberal stance, I’ll go ahead and own it.

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            Cannoneer2 says:

            My real point with that is that if it is fine to pay our teachers, bridge engineers, accountants, etc. a salary that ranks in the bottom 5 of the states, then it ought to be alright to pay our Attorney General, Secretary of State, Governor, Commissioners, etc. at the same level. It would save quite a bundle of money, and I’m sure there would be no dearth of good candidates for those positions. Since you brought up big cities in NY and NJ, it should be pointed out that Tre Hargett earns more than the Secretaries of State in both of those states, and while he does a fine job, I don’t think he achieves anything “above and beyond” to deserve a salary on that scale here in Tennessee.

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            Stuart I. Anderson says:

            I forthrightly state that I am a conservative and my responses and replies I believe bear that out. Your brief comment asked that we pay teachers more which is a cry that we often hear from liberals and rarely conservatives so I assumed you were a liberal. Now calling someone a liberal when they aren’t one is a terrible thing to do so if I have you wrong then that is unfortunate and I’m sorry. If you initially took the position that we should pay our top government officials less, rather than paying teachers more, that would be a good common sense approach to Beatrice’s often heard bleating about paying teachers in government schools more.

            As a free market enthusiast I, as a taxpayer, want to see every government position occupied by competent people who can fill the position for the least amount of money as I would as an owner of any business. Whether the workings of supply and demand puts us first or in the middle or at the bottom of states in terms of compensation for each position doesn’t interest me at all. Government doing as little as possible employing as few people as possible for as little as possible so as to allow citizens as much freedom as possible, now that’s a goal worth achieving.

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            MARLE says:

            You are so right Stuart…..if confiscated dollars are used to pay salaries then we should be getting the best qualified for the lowest price. A teacher makes more IF they have a Masters +30 or a PhD regardless of the result they get.

            Teacher pay is about as backa$$ward as it gets. And higher pay will NOT produce better outcomes or as you said Newark, DC and rest would be at the top of the heap.

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      Green Machine says:

      I agree! Finally someone else who is idealistic and hopeful like me. Go Marquita, Justice Democrats, and progressives!!

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    Eddie White says:

    What a surprise and what a waste of time.

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    Phil Lassiter says:

    Cheap endorsements better fit for northeast, US or Knoxville

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    Taxpayer #314 says:

    Just exactly when and where has there ever been a state that “threw money at government schools.” It has never happened. Maybe your “conservative” standards are a little warped. The so called “government schools” are always underfunded, overcrowded and have teachers using their own funds to supply students with basics that are needed for any child to learn. The misguided allocations that have your Attorney General making mega bucks and public school teachers begging for minimum assistance is something that republicans will never understand.
    Republicans always think “ME” first but, like it or not, you too are part of the general public, you just choose not to do your part, just like the wearing masks issue! That’s not for me, that is for everyone else. Who is going to educate those “competent” people that will staff your conservative minimum cheap-o government?

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      Donna Locke says:

      Why are our schools overcrowded? Give it some thought. Why have our schools become a main welfare distribution station? Give it some thought. Why do majority minority educational outcomes not improve when more and more money is thrown at these schools but do improve when the racial makeup of the class is flipped?

      How on earth did baby boomers thrive in crowded, no-frills classrooms with no breakfast, supper, and snack at school?

      I have four grandchildren learning remotely now. One of them is a high school senior. She said it takes her just 3 or 4 hours to do everything that took a whole school day to accomplish when she was in the school. Another of the kids, who has a form of autism/developmental disorder is doing much better at home without the anxiety he had from the overstimulation, etc., at school. He is in the ninth grade and not in special ed. He sits in front of his computer at home and participates in the class discussion, which he does not tend to do at school. He just aced a geometry test. Got the highest score in the class.

      The one I am most concerned about is the second grader who spent part of his first grade at home because Atlanta closed the schools. It will be up to his mom to pull him forward. He has missed some crucial things.

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      Stuart I. Anderson says:

      It is so unfortunate Taxpayer that your storehouse of information for some reason didn’t grow as fast as your interest in politics because if it did you may have become a conservative instead of the liberal you are today. For example, it is no secret that in big city “union towns,” with their chronically underperforming schools, the teacher’s unions control the schools and the deal is simply you pay them what they want or your schools simply fail to open. This is particularly true in those cities whose teachers are represented by the United Federation of Teachers (“UFT”).

      A great example of this is the current contract between the New York City Dept of Education and the UFT for less than ten month teaching jobs that contains the following provisions:

      Starting salaries for teachers with a bachelors degree and no experience $57,845.
      Starting salaries for teachers with a masters degree and no experience $65,026.
      A teacher with a masters degree, eight years teaching experience and additional course work $87,510.

      In case teachers can’t manage to buy supplies on those salaries “. . .there are additional financial incentives for NYC public school teachers taking on new roles and responsibilities and working in historically underserved school communities.”

      “Teachers can select from a variety of health insurance plans, several of which require no employee contributions. Coverage for teachers AND THEIR FAMILIES [emphasis mine] (including registered domestic partners) begins on the first day or employment.” Teachers receive dental, vision, and prescription drug benefits from the UFT Welfare Fund.

      Teacher’s retirement, disability and death benefits are provided through one of the largest pension systems in the country, the Teachers’ Retirement System of the City of New York. I didn’t have the time to go into just when teachers in NYC can retire and at what percentage of salary but as city employees with a UFT contract I think we can all assume that there aren’t too many 65+ year old infirm teachers hobbling up those school stairs because they simply can’t swing retirement financially.

      That should answer Taxpayer’s question about “Just when and where has there ever been a state that ‘threw money at government schools'” Now with all that, who in their right mind wishes their child can attend NYC’s chronically underperforming schools.

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        MARLE says:

        With regard to NYC pension system…..there are more gov employees populating South Florida which has no state income tax than you shake a stick at.

        Pensions are a deferred salary plus appreciation. So you Earned the salary (and its deferred pension portion) while you resided in NY. BUT you can move and escape the sizeable NY tax on the pension portion. NY is idiotic to lose this kind of revenue and then complain about deficit budgets.

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    Beatrice Shaw says:

    oh come on!! Life is much more expensive now and the educational needs are much more broad. More money has to be spent to keep up. Cost of homes, autos and food all go up. Education has to go up. Teacher pay has lagged behind all other professions.

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    Taxpayer #314 says:

    The Covid problem is just one more example of a society-wide problem that has been dumped on the teachers to solve.
    Stewart says “Government doing as little as possible employing as few people as possible for as little as possible so as to allow citizens as much freedom as possible, now that’s a goal worth achieving.”
    That is precisely what we have now with the hollowed out trump administration, they are doing as little as possible, with as few people as possible but they are stealing as much as possible. You might call that good government but I sure don’t.

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