windle

Casada denies he offered inducements for voucher votes

Rep. John Mark Windle (D-Livingston) speaks with House Finance Chair Susan Lynn (R-Mt. Juliet) in the House chamber on April 23, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

House Speaker Glen Casada, who is resigning next week following the loss of a no-confidence vote, has put out an unusual statement to deny that he offered infrastructure funding or a National Guard promotion in exchange for a positive vote on the controversial school voucher bill.

Democratic state Rep. John Mark Windle of Livingston, who voted against the voucher legislation, confirmed to WTVF-TV that Casada had suggested he might be promoted from a colonel in the Guard if he changed his vote.

“In response to your question, your characterization of the conversation is correct,” Windle said in a statement to WTVF.

“I voted against the bill as a matter of principle, and that vote decision did not change. The people of Fentress, Jackson, Morgan, and Overton counties are fiercely independent, and their vote is not for sale.”

Republican Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver of Lancaster, who also opposed the bill, said Casada suggested a new Interstate interchange at the Carthage-Gordonsville exit might be on the table.

“My reply was, ‘You know that’s bogus. You know you can’t do that,” Weaver told the station.

And Rep. Bob Ramsey (R-Maryville) said Casada’s team hinted there might be funding for a jail expansion in his district if he voted for the bill. He refused.