tennessee historical commission

Tennessee Historical Commission adds 8 sites to National Register

The Tennessee Historical Commission has added eight properties to the National Register of Historic Places. They include a bank in Loretto, a mounted police station in Memphis, and the Water Street Abbey in Lewisburg.

Here’s the release from the Tennessee Historical Commission:

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Historical Commission (THC), the state agency that is designated as the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), today announced the addition of eight properties to the National Register of Historic Places.  They include a farm, bank building, two churches, a mounted police station building, a fallout shelter, and the revision of a historic district.

“Tennessee has a tremendous inheritance of important historic places that are highlighted by the diversity of these recent National Register listings.” said State Historic Preservation Officer and Executive Director Patrick McIntyre.

The sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places are:

Hardwick Farms (Cleveland – Bradley County)

A 1932-33 Spanish Revival style house is the centerpiece of 758-acre Hardwick Farms. Agricultural outbuildings, a garage and servant’s house and landscaped grounds are a few of the other features that make this property a good example of a model farm from the 1930s. C. L. Hardwick purchased and consolidated several smaller farms, grew tobacco, and was known for his Aberdeen-Angus livestock.  His farming enterprise exemplified progressive trends of the early 20th century.  The house was designed by the Knoxville architectural firm of Barber and McMurray and the grounds were designed by Knoxville’s Charles F. Lester.  Hardwick was a well-known businessman, operating the Hardwick Clothes Company, Hardwick Woolen Mills, and the Hardwick Stove Company.  His philanthropy supported many civic projects in Cleveland. The farm is held in a family trust and the land is rented out for livestock raising.

Charles L. Lawhon Cottage (Knoxville – Knox County)

Charles L. Lawhon was a revered marble stone mason in New Orleans and Knoxville.  Known for his monuments and decorative stonework, circa 1922-24, he designed his own home in the Morningside area of Knoxville. City directories recoded Lawhon as a marble designer, marble estimator, and sometimes as an architect.  The two-story stucco house in Knoxville is the only house he is known to have designed.  It is a stylistic mix of bungalow, English Cottage Revival, and Tudor Revival.  Prominent features include textured brick, a large front dormer, flared eaves, a variety of casement windows, and built-in interior features such as benches. Lawhon died in 1926 and the family owned the house until the 1940s.  The current owner is rehabilitating the house.

Bank of Loretto (Loretto – Lawrence County)

The Bank of Loretto was chartered in 1910 and after the original bank building burned circa 1924, the current building was constructed.  C.K Colley and Company Architects from Nashville were the architects of the building.  Colley practiced from 1899 to 1956, but the C.K. Colley and Company was only in operation from 1922-1928.  Local lumber company Augustin Lumber, established in 1900, built the new bank building.  The Classical Revival style bank is sheathed in stone veneer and distinguished by its symmetrical façade and pedimented entrance.  Semi-circular arched windows flank the single-door entrance.  The interior retains historic flooring and skylights.  The Bank of Loretto moved to a larger building in 1967 and the building is now used as a restaurant.

Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. (Lewisburg –Marshall County)

Better known today as the Water Street Abbey, the historic church building was constructed in 1910 for the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Rev. E. L. Orr drew plans and made suggestions for the structure, but the actual architect is unknown.  The first services in the new sanctuary were held on January 11, 1911.  Situated at the corner of Water Street and 3rd Avenue in Lewisburg, it is a prominent example of the Late Gothic Revival style.  The exterior of the brick building features a corner bell tower delineated by Gothic arch openings with y-tracery, a steep pitch roof, and large windows.  The interior retains its Akron plan, with moveable doors that allow for classroom spaces or a larger sanctuary when needed.  When the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. disbanded in 1939, the building was purchased by the Water Street Church of Christ, who held services here until 1967.  In 2007 the current owners purchased the building and plan to rehabilitate it for an event venue.

Continue reading