lottery

Speakers seek delay of sports gambling in Tennessee amid questions about draft rules

Senate Speaker Randy McNally and House Speaker Cameron Sexton await Gov. Bill Lee’s arrival for his second State of the State address in Nashville on Feb. 3, 2020. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Legislative leaders want the Tennessee Lottery to delay the approval of sports gambling rules. Senate Speaker Randy McNally (R-Oak Ridge) and House Speaker Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) wrote in a letter to Lottery Chair Susan Lanigan on Friday that some of the draft rules are outside the scope of the gaming law passed last year.

Here is the text of the letter:

Dear Ms. Lanigan,
We would respectfully request that the Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation Board of Directors and the Sports Wagering Advisory Council delay voting on the rules to implement the “Tennessee Sports Gaming Act.”

There have been concerns brought to our attention that some of the rules, as drafted, may be outside the authority given to the Board or Council pursuant to the “Tennessee Sports Gaming Act.” For example, there is concern that the additional categories of licenses created within the rules aren’t within the scope or authority of the Board or Council under the “Tennessee Sports Gaming Act.” Specifically, the Sports Pool Intermediary License and the Vendor License, and associated fees, are not authorized in the Act.

Please feel free to contact our office with any questions you have regarding this letter,

Thank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,

/signed/
Lt. Governor Randy McNally, Speaker Cameron Sexton

Bipartisan bill would restrict TN lottery advertising

News release from Rep. Andy Holt

NASHVILLE, Feb. 8, 2017– On Wednesday, Tennessee State Rep. Andy Holt (R-Dresden) introduced legislation that targets, what he calls, predatory marketing tactics from the Tennessee Lottery.

“Last month, I raised concern over the way lottery commercials were being used in predatory ways to target Tennessee’s most economically vulnerable citizens by encouraging them to purchase lottery tickets rather than life sustaining goods such as food,” says Holt. “I have, very publicly, asked the Tennessee Lottery to ensure me (and the countless Tennesseans who are upset over these practices) that they would no longer run these types of ads. When the media asked them for comment, they had nothing to say, and they’ve said nothing to me. So, now we’re introducing bi-partisan legislation to put an end to these damaging ads.”

(Note: It’s HB633, though apparently a caption bill subject to change later.)

Holt notes research that highlights the fact that these ads target economically disadvantaged and minorities, which he says is shameful.
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