Cameron Sexton

Sexton elected speaker, Byrd ouster deferred

Rep. Gloria Johnson (D-Knoxville) makes a motion to oust Rep. David Byrd (R-Waynesboro) for sexual misconduct during a special session in Nashville on Aug. 23, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) was elected House Speaker on Friday and the chamber turned back Democrats’ attempts to oust Rep. David Byrd (R-Waynesboro) over sexual misconduct allegations.

Sexton was elected on a 94-0 vote, a rare moment of unity in a House rocked by the scandal-plagued speakership of Glen Casada (R-Franklin), who did not attend the special session.

Efforts to oust Byrd were sent back to the Judiciary Committee.

Rep. Cameron Sexton presides over his first session as House speaker on Aug. 23, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal) 

AG asked to opine on power to oust Byrd from House

Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) speaks to the House Republican Caucus after winning their nomination for speaker on July 24, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Rep. Cameron Sexton, the Republican nominee to be elected speaker during Friday’s special session, is asking state Attorney General Herbert Slatery about whether the chamber has the power to oust Rep. David Byrd over allegations of sexual misconduct with teenage basketball players when he was their coach in the 1980s.

UPDATEThe Tennessean’s Joel Ebert reports that the AG’s office does not anticipate being able to answer in time for the special session.

Here’s the full text of the letter:

Dear General Slatery:

Article 11, Section 12 of the Tennessee Constitution provides:

  • Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member, but not a second time for the same offence; and shall have all other powers necessary for a branch of the Legislature of a free State.

The Tennessee House of Representatives has used the power to expel only twice since 1866. In both instances, the member was expelled for conduct that occurred during the time of the member’s service. I am writing to request an opinion as to the following question:

  • May the House of Representatives expel a member for conduct which occurred more than twenty-five years prior to the member’s initial election to the House of Representatives and that is publicly known at the time of the member’s most recent re-election to the House of Representatives?

As always, I appreciate the work that you and your staff provide to the General Assembly and to the citizens of Tennessee. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Respectfully submitted,

/signed/
Representative Cameron Sexton
25th Representative District

Hazlewood joins race for House GOP Caucus chair

Hazlewood

Rep. Patsy Hazlewood of Signal Mountain is joining the race for House Republican Caucus chair, reports Andy Sher of the Chattanooga Times Free Press. The position is opening because of the nomination of Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) to become the House speaker next week.

Hazlewood is a late entry into the race. She joins Reps. Michael Curcio of Dickson, Jeremy Faison of Cosby, and Jerry Sexton of Bean Station in the contest for the No. 3 caucus leadership position.

Hazlewood, who served as vice chair of the powerful House Finance Committee this session, told Sher she realizes “it is a little bit late in the game” to join the fray.

“But I’ve spent the last few days talking to our members and I do believe there’s room and there’s interest in having me in the role. And again, not to disparage in any way any of the other candidates, I think there’s room for a fourth,” she said.

Hazlewood is a retired AT&T executive and a onetime regional director for the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

The caucus chair is responsible for messaging and political functions of the caucus. Fundraising and campaign work are a major focus of the job. The caucus press secretary is also housed within the office.

“I’m accustomed to working with a lot of divergent opinions,” Hazlewood said. “One of the things I want all to understand is we’re all reflective of our districts. Under this leadership, everyone’s going to be free to vote their districts.”

 

Will Sexton tap the brakes on early roll-out of voucher program?

Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) speaks to colleagues before a House Republican Caucus meeting to nominate a new speaker on July 24, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Count Rep. Cameron Sexton, the Republican nominee for House speaker, among the skeptics of Gov. Bill Lee’s push to roll out the school voucher program a year early.

“I do not think it needs to be accelerated at this point,” Sexton told The Tennessean, adding that his colleagues feel the same way.

Read the full story here.

Sexton retains Gilmer as chief of staff

Scott Gilmer

Cameron Sexton, the Republican nominee to succeed Glen Casada as House speaker next month, has named Scott Gilmer as his chief of staff.

Sexton (R-Crossville) said Gilmer represents his goals of “stability, policy, and consistency” as head of the chamber. Gilmer was former Speaker Beth Harwell’s chief of staff. He was also a top adviser to Casada.

Here’s the full release:

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Republican Speaker Select Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) announced today that Scott Gilmer would serve as his Chief of Staff if he were to be elected Speaker of the House during the special session in August.

“My vision as Speaker of the House of Representative is stability, policy, and consistency, and Scott Gilmer exemplifies those three categories,” said Republican Speaker Select Sexton. “Scott’s experience and institutional knowledge will provide a steady hand and a smooth transition as we move forward and continue to build upon our successes.”

Scott Gilmer has served in the General Assembly for over ten years, seven of which has been in the Chief of Staff role for previous speakers.

Upon accepting the position, Gilmer stated, “I thank Speaker Select Sexton for this opportunity, and I look forward to continuing to serve the great people of Tennessee.”

Sexton prevails in House GOP caucus vote for speaker

Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) speaks to the House Republican Caucus after winning their nomination for speaker on July 24, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Rep. Cameron Sexton of Crossville has won the Republican nomination for House Speaker. He prevailed after four rounds of voting on Wednesday.

In the final round of balloting, Sexton won 41 of 70 votes over Curtis Johnson (R-Clarksville). Matthew Hill of Jonesborough was eliminated in the third round and Mike Carter of Ooltewah and Ryan Williams of Cookeville were dropped after the second round. Jay Reedy of Erin failed to clear the first round of voting.

Sexton pledged not to rehire anyone who had left the employment of the House during the Rep. Glen Casada’s time as speaker. He added that others may not be retained going forward. Casada is scheduled to resign on Aug. 2.

Here’s how the voting played out:

Round 1 Round 2  Round 3 Round 4
Sexton  18 17 27 41
Johnson 16 19 23 29
Hill 16 16 20
Carter 11 9
Williams 8 9
Reedy 1

Photo gallery of House action as Casada elected speaker

Here’s a look at some of the action surrounding the election of Rep. Glen Casada (R-Franklin) as House speaker on Tuesday.

Rep. Glen Casada (R-Franklin) gestures toward former Speaker Beth Harwell (R-Nashville) after his election as speaker in Nashville on Jan. 8, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

House Majority Leader William Lamberth (R-Cottontown) attends a Republican caucus meeting on the first day of the 111th General Assembly on Jan. 8, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

House Republican Caucus Chairman Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) attends a caucus meeting on the first day of the 111th General Assembly on Jan. 8, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

New House Speaker Glen Casada (R-Franklin) takes over the gavel from former Speaker Beth Harwell (R-Nashville) on Jan. 8, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Rep. Matthew Hill (R-Jonesborough) attends a rules meeting in Nashville on Jan. 8, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

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