Bredesen raises $2.4M, loans Senate bid another $2M

Democrat Phil Bredesen raised $2.43 million for his Senate bid the second quarter, while the former governor also donated another $2 million to his campaign.

That places Bredesen’s total collections at $8.2 million since joining the race (including loans from the candidate, which the campaign said are aimed at TV ads and digital efforts).

Republican Marsha Blackburn’s campaign announced that it brought in $2.6 million in the quarter and had $7.3 million on hand moving forward.

Bredesen campaign manager Bob Corney in a “state of the Tennessee U.S. Senate race” memo said the campaign is focused on highlighting his status of as an “independent thinker” compared with Blackburn’s background as a an eight-term member of Congress.

“Our opposition got lulled into the hyper-partisan conventional wisdom of Washington, sleep-walking through the first half of the year by offering a national platform indistinguishable from other incumbents and failing to coalesce support around their candidate,” Corney wrote in the memo.

“In a panic, their campaign now is resorting to fear-mongering and scare tactics typical of the Washington swamp,” he said.

Here is the full memo:

The contrast between the Senate candidates is increasingly clear — Tennessee voters have a choice between an eight-term congresswoman who has contributed to the gridlock in Washington or they can hire someone who is an independent thinker with a proven track record of working across the aisle to get things done for Tennessee.

With a disciplined message on what senators ought to do — put Tennessee first — our campaign has successfully reintroduced Governor Bredesen‘s independent track record, defined the stakes of the race between two candidates who see the role of a Senator very differently, and put pressure on the opposition to play defense in a state that was supposed to be a safe bet last year.

Focus on Tennessee, not Washington, wins over grassroots support and crossover voters

When we launched our campaign in December, we were met with skepticism by Beltway political pundits. But we soon established a competitive race, showcasing why Phil Bredesen remains one of the most popular leaders in Tennessee. Eight months into the campaign we have successfully defined Governor Bredesen’s bipartisan track record and solidified his independent, Tennessee-first approach as his strength by taking on hyper-local issues with bold new ideas and engaging with Republicans and Democrats alike to create solutions to some of the toughest challenges facing our communities.

As we’ve made clear from Day 1, Governor Bredesen is running for a Senate seat to represent the people of Tennessee, not running against the President or a party. Following an earlier TV spot pledging to work with President Trump on policies that benefit Tennesseans, while standing up against policies that hurt the state, we illustrated the point in our fourth TV spot — Tariffs — commending the President for his outreach to North Korea while opposing the administration’s tariffs because they hurt Tennessee.

Our TV and digital programs amplify Governor Bredesen’s bipartisan approach to leadership and his focus on issues that matter to Tennesseans. All credible public polls show Governor Bredesen in the lead and highlight his popularity with Tennesseans, including Democrats and a growing number of Republican voters. Internal polls tell us we continue to gain support from key demographics and in all areas of the state. We feel good about our position at this point in the year, but know that this will be a competitive race. We are taking nothing for granted and we’re ready for the coming onslaught of negative attacks from the opposition, led by Ward “10,000 Cuts” Baker.

Opposition caught sleep-walking, takes Republican support for granted while hitting panic button

Our opposition got lulled into the hyper-partisan conventional wisdom of Washington, sleep-walking through the first half of the year by offering a national platform indistinguishable from other incumbents and failing to coalesce support around their candidate.

In a panic, their campaign now is resorting to fear-mongering and scare tactics typical of the Washington swamp. A recording leaked from a meeting of partisan activists features our opponent’s national strategist threatening Republicans who support Governor Bredesen, saying “I’ll do everything in my power to make sure that they have trouble living in the future.” This is exactly the kind of vitriol that embodies the swamp.

Phil Bredesen is running a campaign against hyper-partisanship. Tennesseans agree that the opposition’s bizarre rant underscores why we need common sense in Washington. We asked online donors to chip in to help us match the 10,000 cuts with $10,000 in grassroots support — and hundreds of supporters chipped in more than $75,000 in 48 hours.

The contrast between the Senate candidates is increasingly clear — Tennessee voters have a choice between an eight-term congresswoman who has contributed to the gridlock in Washington or they can hire someone who is an independent thinker with a proven track record of working across the aisle to get things done for Tennessee.

With a disciplined message on what senators ought to do — put Tennessee first — our campaign has successfully reintroduced Governor Bredesen’s independent track record, defined the stakes of the race between two candidates who see the role of a Senator very differently, and put pressure on the opposition to play defense in a state that was supposed to be a safe bet last year.

Focus on Tennessee, not Washington, wins over grassroots support and crossover voters

When we launched our campaign in December, we were met with skepticism by Beltway political pundits. But we soon established a competitive race, showcasing why Phil Bredesen remains one of the most popular leaders in Tennessee. Eight months into the campaign we have successfully defined Governor Bredesen’s bipartisan track record and solidified his independent, Tennessee-first approach as his strength by taking on hyper-local issues with bold new ideas and engaging with Republicans and Democrats alike to create solutions to some of the toughest challenges facing our communities.

As we’ve made clear from Day 1, Governor Bredesen is running for a Senate seat to represent the people of Tennessee, not running against the President or a party. Following an earlier TV spot pledging to work with President Trump on policies that benefit Tennesseans, while standing up against policies that hurt the state, we illustrated the point in our fourth TV spot — Tariffs– commending the President for his outreach to North Korea while opposing the administration’s tariffs because they hurt Tennessee.

Our TV and digital programs amplify Governor Bredesen’s bipartisan approach to leadership and his focus on issues that matter to Tennesseans. All credible public polls show Governor Bredesen in the lead and highlight his popularity with Tennesseans, including Democrats and a growing number of Republican voters. Internal polls tell us we continue to gain support from key demographics and in all areas of the state. We feel good about our position at this point in the year, but know that this will be a competitive race. We are taking nothing for granted and we‘re ready for the coming onslaught of negative attacks from the opposition, led by Ward “10,000 Cuts” Baker.

Opposition caught sleep-walking, takes Republican support for granted while hitting panic button

Our opposition got lulled into the hyper-partisan conventional wisdom of Washington, sleep-walking through the first half of the year by offering a national platform indistinguishable from other incumbents and failing to coalesce support around their candidate.

In a panic, their campaign now is resorting to fear-mongering and scare tactics typical of the Washington swamp. A recording leaked from a meeting of partisan activists features our opponent’s national strategist threatening Republicans who support Governor Bredesen, saying “I’ll do everything in my power to make sure that they have trouble living in the future.” This is exactly the kind of vitriol that embodies the swamp.

Phil Bredesen is running a campaign against hyper-partisanship. Tennesseans agree that the opposition’s bizarre rant underscores why we need common sense in Washington. We asked online donors to chip in to help us match the 10,000 cuts with $10,000 in grassroots support — and hundreds of supporters chipped in more than $75,000 in 48 hours.

Harnessing momentum into action and victory in November

Tennesseans continue to show their support for Governor Bredesen’s Senate bid with contributions big and small. In the second quarter, we collected more than $4.48 million, including $2.43 million in contributions and a $2 million loan from Governor Bredesen to continue investing in the campaign’s TV and digital programs. Since launching in December our campaign has received more than $8.2 million. We are doubling down the campaign’s strong focus on grassroots organizing and reinvesting in communities across the state with 15 Victory Tennessee offices that serve as organizing hubs to help us win in November.

This campaign is open to anyone who is tired of partisan bickering and ready to work together to get things done for Tennessee. We have more than momentum on our side now — we have the strength of a principled campaign that will send Phil Bredesen to the Senate to represent the people of Tennessee.

 

13 Responses to Bredesen raises $2.4M, loans Senate bid another $2M

  • Susan E Gingrich says:

    Another rich man trying to buy an election and fool Tennesseans. He supports the federal minimum wage and other non-conservative ideas. The past is the past, and democrats are now led by unreasonable far, left liberals. Does anyone truly believe Phil Bredesen will back President Trump over Chuck Schumer and the Democrat party? Too many leftist, angry, blue state dems are moving to TN for financial reasons. They don’t need help in taking over the state, by electing this candidate.

    • Tennessee Jed says:

      Hate to break it to you Susan, but most of your actual GOP candidates support the federal minimum wage as well. The difference between the parties comes in where it is set at.

      I used to hate the minimum wage, but now I am pretty conflicted. I was talking about it with a buddy one time and he brought up a pretty good point. By companies like McDonalds, WalMart, etc… not paying full time workers enough to meet basic standard of living requirements, the taxpayers are subsidizing those businesses in hiring labor at a cheaper price. Even working full time and more, we have many people eating up government funds on food stamps, rent-assistance, and other social safety net programs – which are often bloated, inefficient, and ineffectual. Unless these programs are gutted (fat chance given we have GOP-led government at every level and it still hasn’t happened), taxpayers/consumers would be better off making businesses pay for the full cost of these employees rather than subsidizing them through government assistance.

      Really, it’s a lose-lose situation that we are in right now. But I think it is a more conservative position to give this money to workers directly rather than indirectly through more government programs that have to be managed (aka waste resources). Less recipients to manage and we can start eliminating some government jobs that manage these programs. Smaller more efficient government. Not the ultimate goal, but better than the current situation.

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  • Iva Russell says:

    I can remember when this blog gave us news.

  • Silence Dogood says:

    Apparently being rich is just not as satisfying as it once was. Everyone with a few million dollars wants to be an elected official. My experience with the rich is that they never, ever have enough money. So this rush to being elected must be a money based scheme to get even more money. Like Lil Bill Corker or Philbert Bredesen did. (Arbitrarily, I define having more than $10,000,000 in the bank as being rich.)

    • Tennessee Jed says:

      Agree Silence Dogood. That is why I said no to D.C. Diane, Boyd, and Lee. Went with Harwell. Not trying to buy the Governor’s mansion. Will enact a solid conservative agenda, not a oligarchic agenda.

      • Stuart I. Anderson says:

        Did you already vote? If so that’s a shame. Discussing what Beth will or won’t do is a glorious waste of time because she has little chance of becoming governor. Voting for someone because they have the least amount of money of any candidate in the race shows a sort of class hostility that is more at home in the Democratic Party than the Republican Party.

        Conservatives don’t have a chance of ever getting this country back on the right track unless they control the Republican Party as effectively as the liberals control the Democratic Party? Most elections in Republican primaries reduce themselves to a challenge by conservatives to rest control of the Republican Party away from the centrists and colder tepid conservatives. Are you a conservative Jed? If so you’ve taken yourself out of that conflict by doing nothing to prevent the centrist candidate, Randy! Boyd, from getting elected Governor by voting for someone with almost no chance of getting elected.

        • James White says:

          Stuart, you are wrong again. The Republican party is controlled by a very few people. They will not relinquish control. If elected congressmen do not vote the way the Party bosses want, then they will spend Republican Party money to Get you out of office. It is that simple. The constitution nor conservatism have nothing to do with their agenda.

        • Tennessee Jed says:

          Stuart, I believe that I answered your question by voting for a conservative candidate that has proven results. I am not going to discredit candidates for having money. But I will when they use their money and political power only to enrich themselves, like D.C. Diane has done over and over. You want to know who enacts the “colder tepid conservative” agenda? Lobbyists who control swamp dwellers like Marsha and D.C. Diane. You want an actual conservative agenda? Start actually voting for conservatives….not ones who like to pretend to be one for votes like D.C. Diane.

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