Tennessee Historical Commission adds 8 sites to National Register

The Tennessee Historical Commission has added eight properties to the National Register of Historic Places. They include a bank in Loretto, a mounted police station in Memphis, and the Water Street Abbey in Lewisburg.

Here’s the release from the Tennessee Historical Commission:

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Historical Commission (THC), the state agency that is designated as the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), today announced the addition of eight properties to the National Register of Historic Places.  They include a farm, bank building, two churches, a mounted police station building, a fallout shelter, and the revision of a historic district.

“Tennessee has a tremendous inheritance of important historic places that are highlighted by the diversity of these recent National Register listings.” said State Historic Preservation Officer and Executive Director Patrick McIntyre.

The sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places are:

Hardwick Farms (Cleveland – Bradley County)

A 1932-33 Spanish Revival style house is the centerpiece of 758-acre Hardwick Farms. Agricultural outbuildings, a garage and servant’s house and landscaped grounds are a few of the other features that make this property a good example of a model farm from the 1930s. C. L. Hardwick purchased and consolidated several smaller farms, grew tobacco, and was known for his Aberdeen-Angus livestock.  His farming enterprise exemplified progressive trends of the early 20th century.  The house was designed by the Knoxville architectural firm of Barber and McMurray and the grounds were designed by Knoxville’s Charles F. Lester.  Hardwick was a well-known businessman, operating the Hardwick Clothes Company, Hardwick Woolen Mills, and the Hardwick Stove Company.  His philanthropy supported many civic projects in Cleveland. The farm is held in a family trust and the land is rented out for livestock raising.

Charles L. Lawhon Cottage (Knoxville – Knox County)

Charles L. Lawhon was a revered marble stone mason in New Orleans and Knoxville.  Known for his monuments and decorative stonework, circa 1922-24, he designed his own home in the Morningside area of Knoxville. City directories recoded Lawhon as a marble designer, marble estimator, and sometimes as an architect.  The two-story stucco house in Knoxville is the only house he is known to have designed.  It is a stylistic mix of bungalow, English Cottage Revival, and Tudor Revival.  Prominent features include textured brick, a large front dormer, flared eaves, a variety of casement windows, and built-in interior features such as benches. Lawhon died in 1926 and the family owned the house until the 1940s.  The current owner is rehabilitating the house.

Bank of Loretto (Loretto – Lawrence County)

The Bank of Loretto was chartered in 1910 and after the original bank building burned circa 1924, the current building was constructed.  C.K Colley and Company Architects from Nashville were the architects of the building.  Colley practiced from 1899 to 1956, but the C.K. Colley and Company was only in operation from 1922-1928.  Local lumber company Augustin Lumber, established in 1900, built the new bank building.  The Classical Revival style bank is sheathed in stone veneer and distinguished by its symmetrical façade and pedimented entrance.  Semi-circular arched windows flank the single-door entrance.  The interior retains historic flooring and skylights.  The Bank of Loretto moved to a larger building in 1967 and the building is now used as a restaurant.

Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. (Lewisburg –Marshall County)

Better known today as the Water Street Abbey, the historic church building was constructed in 1910 for the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Rev. E. L. Orr drew plans and made suggestions for the structure, but the actual architect is unknown.  The first services in the new sanctuary were held on January 11, 1911.  Situated at the corner of Water Street and 3rd Avenue in Lewisburg, it is a prominent example of the Late Gothic Revival style.  The exterior of the brick building features a corner bell tower delineated by Gothic arch openings with y-tracery, a steep pitch roof, and large windows.  The interior retains its Akron plan, with moveable doors that allow for classroom spaces or a larger sanctuary when needed.  When the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. disbanded in 1939, the building was purchased by the Water Street Church of Christ, who held services here until 1967.  In 2007 the current owners purchased the building and plan to rehabilitate it for an event venue.

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McNally statement on execution of Lee Hall

Senate Speaker Randy McNally’s comment on the execution of Lee Hall on Thursday evening:

After nearly three decades, the moment of justice has finally arrived for the family of Traci Crozier. She was set on fire and left for dead by an individual who proclaimed to love her. After 36 hours of unfathomable pain and suffering, she died. Today a sentence of death was carried out against the individual responsible. In the state of Tennessee, we reserve the ultimate and irrevocable penalty of death for crimes such as these. While there is little pleasure in it, there is no doubt justice was served tonight. I can only hope the family of the victim can now have some measure of peace.

Here’s what Gov. Bill Lee has to say in declining to intervene in the case.

The justice system has extensively reviewed Lee Hall’s case over the course of almost 30 years, including additional review and rulings by the Tennessee Supreme Court yesterday and today. The judgment and sentence stand based on these rulings, and I will not intervene in this case.

Roe says he’s undecided about re-election bid to Congress

Just when everyone thought U.S. Rep. Phil Roe was certain to run for another term, the Johnson City Republican has cast new doubt on those prospects.

Roe, 74, told WJHL-TV that he will gather with his family over Christmas to decide about whether to seek a seventh term.

Rep. Phil Roe considering re-election plans, will make decision at Christmas

“The hardest part of my job is not what you would think about going to Washington,” Roe said. “That’s what we do. That’s what I’m hired to do. But it’s the travel – getting on four airplane flights a week and being away from family. That, to me, is the hard part.”

Roe had a more than $445,000 balance in his campaign account at the end of the most recent reporting period.

Lee signs order moving disability services for young children out of Education Department

Gov. Bill Lee welcomes delegates to a summit on economically distressed counties in Linden on Aug. 13, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Gov. Bill Lee has signed an executive order to move development services for young children with disabilities out of the state Education Department. They will now be housed within the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Here’s the release from the Lee administration:

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Today, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee issued an executive order transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System (TEIS) from the Tennessee Department of Education to the Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to better align services for children with disabilities.

TEIS is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities that supports families through child development resources. The program encourages optimal development through community and family activities.

“This program is vital to the growth and development of children with disabilities,” said Gov. Lee. “We look forward to better serving TEIS families and ensuring Tennessee is a place where people of all abilities thrive.”

Since taking office in January, this is the 10th executive order signed by Gov. Lee.

Lee signs proclamation declaring Rosa Parks Day in Tennessee

Gov. Bill Lee sits in a bus at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis after signing a proclamation declaring Rosa Parks Day in Tennessee on Dec. 1, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Republican Gov. Bill Lee traveled to Memphis on Sunday to sign a proclamation declaring Rosa Parks Day in Tennessee. The bill to honor Parks on the anniversary of her 1955 arrest for refusing to move to the back of a bus in Montgomery, Ala., was sponsored by Sen. Raumesh Akbari and Rep. Karen Camper (both D-Memphis).

Lee called Parks “an inspiring human being, who did so much for so many, so [I’m] proud to be working with the legislature today to honor her.”

Lee got into hot water last summer over signing a proclamation honoring slave trader and Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, as required by a state law dating back to 1969. Lee has said he hopes to change that law next legislative session.

Parks is a better example of historical figures the state’s should be honoring with proclamations, Lee told reporters Sunday.

“It’s important that we recognize folks who have made major contributions for civil rights in this country and to change the trajectory for civil rights,” Lee said.

“Whenever we can make proclamations about inspiring individuals who are to be celebrated — and that’s someone who is celebrated by everyone  — that’s the  kind of thing we need to be doing in this state.”

 

Vandy baseball team declines White House visit

The Vanderbilt baseball team declined a White House visit to celebrate its 2019 NCAA championship, The Washington Post reports.

A spokesman told the paper the invitation was “respectfully declined [because of] long-standing travel plans for our student-athletes to return home for the Thanksgiving holiday.”

Last year’s winner, Oregon State, visited President Donald Trump in the White House instead.

The White House event was to celebrate 22 champions from non-revenue sports. NCAA football and basketball champions have visited on their own.

 

The Tennessee Journal: The perfect gift for that political junkie in your life

Looking for the perfect gift for that certain someone who just can’t get enough of the inner working Tennessee politics? Look no further than The Tennessee Journal, the weekly insiders’ newsletter on state government, politics since 1975.

For just $209 for the first year, you will receive 49 issues covering major happenings at the state Capitol and from the campaign trail. Download a sample copy here.

The upcoming year promises to be the latest chapter of upheaval in state politics. And The Tennessee Journal will be there to cover it all, including:

√ Another open U.S. Senate seat.

√ Tennessee’s presidential primary on Super Tuesday.

√ New Gov. Bill Lee ramping up for his second legislative session.

√ A new House speaker tries to bring calm to the chamber after his predecessor barely lasted half a year.

√ The state prepares to roll out a controversial school voucher program after the governor’s signature legislation passed under controversial circumstances.

√ All 99 state House seats and half of the 33 state Senate seats are up for election.

√ Freshmen members of the Tennessee congressional delegation (three in the House and one in the Senate) work to make their mark in Washington.

√  Revenue collections continue to overflow the state’s coffers, but for how long?

And, as always, The Tennessee Journal will closely monitor the progress of key bills, legislative maneuvering, and the state budget.

Subscribe here!

Happy Thanksgiving from assorted Tennessee politicos

Happy Thanksgiving from The Tennessee Journal. And, as Twitter reminds us, from an assortment of public officials and those aspiring to join their ranks:

McNally says renaming Cordell Hull Building shouldn’t be done ‘without considerable forethought and study’

Former Gov. Winfield Dunn awaits the start of the of the inauguration of Gov. Bill Lee in Nashville on Jan. 19, 2019. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Senate Speaker Randy McNally (R-Oak Ridge) doesn’t appear quite as eager to push through a new name for the legislative office complex as some of his House counterparts. Rep. Ron Gant (R-Rossville) announced last week he plans to introduce legislation to name the building after former Gov. Winfield Dunn. The facility constructed in the 1950s is named after Cordell Hull, the country’s longest-serving Secretary of State.

“This is not something that should be done without considerable forethought and study,” McNally told The Tennessean.

McNally got his start in politics working for Dunn’s 1970 campaign for governor, calling him “a great man (and an) outstanding governor. But he also praised Hull, who was a state representative before serving in the U.S. House and Senate.

Mackler blasts GOP opponents for Blackburn tweet

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate James Mackler is criticizing his Republican opponents for being “clones” of Republican Marsha Blackburn, who was elected to the chamber last year. Mackler, a former Army helicopter pilot, took aim at comments Blackburn made about Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who testified in the congressional impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Blackburn has said she stands by a tweet that stated: “Vindictive Vindman in the ‘whistleblower’s’ handler.” Republican candidates Bill Hagerty and Manny Sethi have defended the president and condemned the House probe.

Mackler closed his law practice after the Sept. 11 terror attacks to join the Army. He spent three years as a Black Hawk helicopter pilot for the 101st Airborne Division, which included a deployment to Iraq. He later served as a military prosecutor for the Judge Advocate General Corps.